Be Honest: Feedback Critical For Career Growth As Women In The Workplace

Diana Vogt Faro founded W.net for women in the payroll industry to network and offer feedback opportunities. Oh, the feedback forms. Whether going old school with pencils and paper distributed at the end of your talk, or online surveys emailed to you when the conference ends, feedback is both essential and terrifying. Whether you have to give it or receive it.Written or oral, comments on your performance, your presentation, your growth or your missteps can be devastating when they catch you off guard. You think you are absolutely at the top of your game, and you discover through the forms or the sit-down that your supervisor or your co-workers secretly wish you would take a month off to stay home or just get promoted to another office.But honest feedback can be a very good thing as women in the workplace. And when honest and strategic, it can help you improve or change course all together.[bctt tweet=“Honest feedback can be a very good thing as women in the workplace.”]Rosina Racioppi, president and CEO of Women Unlimited Inc., is good at giving and advising on feedback. Lauren Schiller writes in Fortune that Racioppi “helps women meet their full potential as leaders at some of the world’s largest companies, including Adobe Systems, Bayer, Colgate-Palmolive, and Prudential. For her, feedback is a two-way avenue.“She adds, “The best advice I’ve gotten is to give people feedback on what you consider the strengths that they bring to the organization and their role. Help them understand their impact so that they can see that trajectory of talent and impact,” Racioppi tells Schiller. “And then have an honest dialogue about: ‘What are you interested in? What would you like to be doing?’ As a leader, we don’t need to create the plan for the individual. We need to help them craft it for themselves. That’s really what a good leader does.”Women leaders have a particular need for honest feedback and mentoring as they grow their careers. In careers where you have to seek out role models and create networks, feedback is crucial, according to Wendy Murphy writing in Harvard Business Review.[bctt tweet=“In careers where you have to seek out role models and create networks, feedback is crucial”]